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    Oklahoma struggles, then scores 49 straight against Tulane

    Sophomore cornerback Parnell Motley, left, and linebacker Caleb Kelly celebrate a defensive stop in Saturday's 56-14 win over Tulane.
    BY JOHN ROHDE

    Special to SoonerSports.com

    Sept. 16, 2007

    NORMAN – In the post-game huddle after last Saturday night's 31-16 triumph at No. 2-ranked Ohio State, Oklahoma coach Lincoln Riley instructed his team to put the historic victory behind them because there was much more work to do this season.

    Riley feared his team might battle a football hangover while preparing for its upcoming contest against Tulane, and he was right.

    Overcoming a sluggish start to the week and an even more sluggish start to the game, the No. 2-ranked Sooners (3-0) eventually regained their focus and posted a 56-14 victory over the Green Wave (1-2) on Saturday night at Gaylord Family - Oklahoma Memorial Stadium. The victory stretched the nation's longest active winning streak to 13 games, which is OU's longest since winning 14 straight in 2002-03.

    "Sure, you're concerned about a letdown," Riley said afterward. "You're concerned about how they'll approach the week. I thought, for the most part, our mentality was good. We weren't at our best early in the week and I thought we started to respond a little bit as the week went on as we continued to challenge them as coaches. So I think we're growing, but we've got to understand that you've got to put together complete weeks if you want to play complete games."

    At the outset, Tulane's option offense had its way with the Sooners defense, rolling up 151 yards rushing in its first 24 attempts (6.3 yards per carry). In the pass-crazed landscape of college football, preparing for a run-oriented attack in a one-week span presents some defensive challenges.

    "They do it 365 days a year," Riley said of the Green Wave running their option attack. "Our scout team does it for four days a year. It's hard, just the speed of it initially on the first series. When you don't stop it the first time, sometimes you start trying to do things on your own and that's when you really, really get in trouble and there was some of that certainly on the second drive."

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    Ohio State win was fun, but Sooners still have work to do

     

    BY JOHN ROHDE

    Special to SoonerSports.com

    Sept. 11, 2017

    Oklahoma's 31-16 victory at No. 2-ranked Ohio State last Saturday figures to resonate throughout the rest of this season and beyond.

    Many of the Sooners' achievements were historic. There was a mile of milestones:

    • The largest crowd over to witness an OU football game (109,088) watched the Sooners erupt for 21 straight points in a span of less than eight minutes to hand Buckeyes coach Urban Meyer only his third home loss in his six seasons at the school.
    • It marked just the second time in school history OU beat a non-conference team ranked No. 1 or 2 in the Associated Press poll on the road. The previous time was in 1963 when the No. 3 Sooners beat No. 1 USC 17-12 in Bud Wilkinson's last year as head coach.
    • Quarterback Baker Mayfield completed 27 of 35 passes for 386 yards and three touchdowns against one of the nation's premier defenses and is a Heisman Trophy contender for the third straight season. "We got beat by a good team, a very good team, and a quarterback that was dynamic," Meyer said afterward. "I thought our defense hung in there against, like I said, a very good player."
    • The Sooners were named the Football Writers Association of America's National Team of the Week and rolled up 490 total yards of offense (most by an Ohio State opponent in Columbus in five years) while handing the Buckeyes their largest margin of defeat at home since 1999. OU's 386 passing yards were the most by an OSU opponent at Ohio Stadium in 32 years.
    • The last time OU gave up fewer than 13 points to a Top-5 AP opponent was in 2004 in a 12-0 shutout over No. 5 Texas.
    • Lincoln Riley became the first Sooners head coach to defeat a Top-5 opponent in his debut season since Chuck Fairbanks beat No. 2 Tennessee at the Orange Bowl in 1970.
    • It was the Sooners' 12th straight true road win, tied for the third-longest streak in school history. OU also won 12 in a row on the road from Oct. 23, 1948 to Dec. 2, 1950.
    • The Sooners were able to avenge last year's 45-21 home loss to the Buckeyes on Sept. 17. OU hasn't lost since and owns the longest active FBS winning streak at 12 straight. The Sooners improved to 15-2 since 2009 against teams they lost to the previous season.

     

    Impressive as last Saturday night's grudge match victory was, Riley quickly turned the page. In fact, he did so immediately afterward inside his jubilant locker room.

    "I told them in there, 'We'll be disappointed if this is the highlight of our season,'" Riley said during his post-game interview session in the bowels of Ohio Stadium. "We've still got a long ways to go ... We've got to get a lot better. We've taken some positive steps. One of our early season goals was playing better early, period. But now our challenge will be to improve as we have the past two years here. Everybody's going to keep getting better and we've got to do the same."

    Riley reiterated this same attitude two days later at his weekly media luncheon as the now No. 2-ranked Sooners (2-0) prepare for Saturday's 5 p.m. home contest against Tulane (1-1).

    "We've won two games," Riley said with a shrug. "We appreciate it. We're happy about it, but there's so much more to go. We certainly didn't play perfect, by any stretch. We found a lot of things that we have to do better at as a team, but our mentality really was at a high level the whole night. We're happy that we won it, but now we've got to all move on. We've got a lot of ball left here."

    First-year OU assistant head coach/defensive tackles coach Ruffin McNeill, who served as Riley's boss at Texas Tech and East Carolina, has been in college coaching since 1985 and constantly is tapping into the minds of players.

    McNeill frequently calls out "FIDO," which stands for "Forget It and Drive On."

    "Something tough happens, forget it, play (the) next play," McNeill explained last month. "Something good happens, forget it, play (the) next play. Yesterday's history. Tomorrow's a mystery. Make today a masterpiece. Once they grasp that, they'll be ready."

    The Sooners seem to have grasped McNeill's credo quite well. Riley agrees.

    Asked if he will continue to stress the importance of his players not dwelling on Saturday's unforgettable triumph, OU's head coach said, "If we're going to be the team we hope that we can be, it shouldn't be something I should have to address over and over. Our mindset should already be there. You have to be all-in each week. We were all-in as far as winning that game. Our guys really put it on the line all night, but you're only as good as your next performance."

    That next performance will come against the Green Wave, an American Athletic Conference program Riley faced as an assistant at East Carolina.

    The Sooners started last season 1-2 against non-conference opponents with a season-opening loss at Houston, a home victory over ULM and the home loss to Ohio State. This led to Riley stressing the importance of getting off to a good start this season.

    "This is still the start," Riley said of Saturday's game against Tulane. "The start for me is until we get to Big 12 play."

    That comes next Saturday at Baylor. This week, the focus is on Tulane.

    Drive on.

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    BILL SELF: From ORU, to Tulsa, to Illinois, to Kansas, to Springfield

    Okmulgee native Bill Self delivers his induction speech at the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame on Sept. 8 in Springfield, Mass.

     

    BY JOHN ROHDE

    (Reprinted from 2017 Commemorative Yearbook & Enshrinement Program)

    Sept. 8, 2017

    Bill Self was asked if he remembered what happened when his Oral Roberts team played on Dec. 2, 1994. Self paused briefly, then asked for the opponent.

    Informed it was Texas A&M, Self answered instantaneously. “It was a home game against (coach) Tony Barone and we lost on a late tip-in,” Self said, and he was correct. Hosting the Bank IV Classic at the Mabee Center, ORU overcame a 15-point deficit, but missed two attempts in the closing seconds and lost 60-58 on a tip-in with 25 seconds left.

    Asked if he recalled the significance of that game, Self deadpanned, “You mean other than losing?”

    Self’s team indeed had lost. Again. For the 18th straight time. It was a losing streak that stretched nearly 11 months, spanning the last 15 games of Self’s first season as a Division I head coach and the first three games of his second season.

    The skid mercilessly came to a halt with a victory against Appalachian State the night after losing to Texas A&M. Self’s team promptly lost four of the next five, closed out the season by losing five straight, then started his third season with a two-game losing streak.

    At this point, Self’s career record stood at 16-40 (.286). Though he was employed at a parochial institution, Self’s immediate future as a coach didn’t appear to have much of a prayer.

    Early struggles were anticipated, however. ORU had just completed a two-year process of dropping its brief NAIA status to re-qualify for its previous NCAA Division I standing as an independent.

    Self had spent the seven previous seasons serving as an assistant coach at his alma mater of Oklahoma State, roughly 70 miles west. His first four seasons (two as a part-time assistant) came under Leonard Hamilton and the last three were full-time stints for Eddie Sutton, whose powerful influence essentially clinched a 30-year-old Self getting hired at Oral Roberts.

    Back then, painted across each baseline on the court inside the Mabee Center was the message “Expect a Miracle.” It was Sutton who playfully suggested to Self that the court’s baseline message be changed to “It’s Going to Take a Miracle.”

    With such a precarious start, there was no telling where Self’s fledgling career was headed. He certainly didn’t seem destined for the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame in Springfield, Mass., but here he is at the tender age of 54.

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    No longer boxed in, Emmanuel Beal returns to Columbus

     

    BY JOHN ROHDE

    SoonerSports.com Contributor

    Sept. 7, 2017

    A pint-sized Emmanuel Beal thought boxing might be his destiny while growing up in Grand Rapids, Mich.

    Beal was determined, energetic, tough and athletic, but he also was on the small side. Boxing was the best opportunity to hit somebody his own size, plus Beal could reap the tutelage of his uncle and older cousin, who both competed in Golden Gloves.

    Beal recalled he had to cut his workout short in the gym because he had a football scrimmage that same day. A fifth-grader at the time, Beal knew he had to choose between boxing and football. The fact Beal, OU's starting weakside linebacker, returned as the Sooners' leading tackler from last season proves he chose wisely.

    There have been a lifetime of decisions for Beal since his retirement from the sweet science, however.

    In the middle of seventh grade, though none of Beal’s siblings wanted to do so, his family moved from Michigan to Ohio. “That’s a point where you start building relationships with friends and people, then you just up and move,” Beal said. “None of my brothers and sisters wanted to leave, but it literally was for our best interests.”

    Beal’s first year of varsity football was his sophomore season in high school. “Physically, my coaches saw something there,” Beal said. “I guess I was good. Looking back, I guess I could say I was all right at it. I guess it was my way of seeing the ball. I just see the ball and go get it.”

    Beal’s performance in the classroom was not all right, however. Michigan State ended its recruitment of Beal when they looked at his grades. Torn what to do next, Beal decided to leave football and wound up working at a gas station and in a factory. “I spent a year outside of football,” Beal said. “Then I was like, ‘I don’t like working.’”

    Beal looked for a junior college located close to home. With no NJCAA programs in Ohio, Beal said his closest option was Lackawanna College, located 475 miles away in Scranton, Pa. “When I got accepted (as a student), I was there the next day as a walk-on (for football),” Beal said. “I just felt if you really want something, nobody can stop you from getting to where you need to go.”

    Beal didn’t physically work out during his one-year retirement, but his love of football never waned. “I thought about football every day,” Beal said. “I literally watched every game of college football and I was like, ‘Man, I can do that.’ It just drove me even more to get back into football.”

    Though he weighed shy of 200 pounds, Beal played defensive end his first season at Lackawanna and switched to outside linebacker the following year. Beal said the move “wasn’t that tough a change,” the primary difference being whether he took his stance with a hand in the dirt.

    Beal’s first major-college scholarship offer out of junior college came from Akron in Ohio. His first offer from a Power Five conference came from OU, although Beal admitted he was naïve about the Sooners. “I just knew they were good at football. That’s all I knew,” Beal said. “And when you’re in juco, whatever school you think you could play at – or whatever school that offers you – you just take it.”

    Thing is, OU initially didn’t have Beal in mind when studying players from Lackawanna. Sooners offensive lineman Ashton Julious and running back Marcelias Sutton also played for the Falcons.

    “We were actually looking at some other players on his team when he showed up on film,” OU inside linebacker coach Tim Kish said of Beal. “Very athletic, great speed off the edge. He was really more of an outside linebacker than he was a true inside linebacker. (We) couldn’t pass up that athleticism. On film, he showed us great instincts for playing on the defensive side of the ball. It was a no-brainer to us at that time to get involved with him, and thank goodness we did.”

    Beal played in all 13 games last season and started the final 10 after replacing injured Tay Evans. Beal finished with 81 total tackles, second only to fellow linebacker Jordan Evans, who is now with the NFL Cincinnati Bengals.

    Just like in his youth, Beal remains determined, energetic, tough and athletic. He also remains on the small side for the position he plays. Listed at 6-foot, 218 pounds, he has gained roughly 15 pounds since arriving at OU.

    “I’ve been hearing that my whole life,” Beal said of being undersized. “It’s like, ‘OK, so what’s new?’ I’m accustomed to playing against bigger people. It really wasn’t a problem to me. It was something I was used to. It just goes in one ear and out the other, honestly … I don’t care what people say. At the end of the day it’s football. Size really doesn’t matter in football. If you worry about size, then you’ve already lost.”

    Sooners All-American offensive tackle Orlando Brown, who goes 6-foot-8, 345 pounds, often collides with Beal in practice and there’s much respect on both sides. “The impact he made was immediate,” Brown said of Beal. “I think our coaches trust him a lot. The energy level and emotion that he plays with gets everybody going around him from a defensive standpoint or even an offensive standpoint. He’s really physical. He’s a lot stronger than he looks. He has a really good understanding for the game, too. He’s really quick, he’s really fast, which I think is really important. If you’re going to be an undersized guy, you’re going to have to be overly fast. As far as I know, he’s pretty much in the top tier in speed and athleticism for his position.”

    Beal said playing smart is his equalizer. He might have struggled in the classroom earlier in life, but being a student of football hasn’t been a problem. “I became smarter than what most people think,” Beal said. “When you are undersized, you’ve got to be smarter than a lot of other people. You’ve got to study two times harder than other people. You have to know where you have to be when the ball is snapped. I think that’s what got me here. I studied a lot. When I look back, it’s just amazing to me how everything has happened.”

    Kish has become close to Beal and respects the path he took before coming to Norman. “It’s to his credit to have that character and that drive and that willpower to want to do something really positive with his life and for his family,” Kish said of Beal. “He chose to go back to school, which we’re certainly glad he did.”

    How has Beal endured? “To me, it’s pretty simple,” Kish said. “It’s his drive. It’s his motivation. He’s been a team guy since he’s been here. He’s not real talkative at times, but when he does speak, people listen. When he first got here, the enthusiasm when he went out there had was second to none. He might as well have been a freshman coming in. He just tried to fit in and be a part of the team and help out any way he could. His drive was there. His motivation was there. It is an amazing journey.”

    Although this is Beal’s second and final season with the Sooners, he quickly became close to his new teammates. These benefits have been evident all week as the No. 5-ranked Sooners prepare for their showdown against No. 2-ranked Ohio State at 6:30 p.m. Saturday back in Beal’s hometown of Columbus.

    “Because he’s going home, we’re all going to play that much harder because that’s my brother and I want him to get a win in Columbus,” senior defensive end/linebacker Ogbonnia Okoronkwo said.

    In addition to Beal, junior offensive lineman Alex Dalton, freshman long snapper Kasey Kelleher, defensive coordinator/outside linebackers coach Mike Stoops and Kish all hail from the Buckeye State. “I tell you, from our leaders to our scout team, everyone is dialed in on this game,” Beal said. “Not only are they doing it for me, they’re doing it for themselves, their families, the good of the program, the coaches and the staff.”

    “We always talk about those type of things,” OU senior strong safety Steven Parker said of teammates returning to their home areas. “We chat about it throughout the week, but there’s going to be a lot more chatter this week because of all those guys going back to Ohio.”

    Interestingly, Beal never cared about the Michigan-Ohio State rivalry while growing up in Grand Rapids. All that changed when he relocated to Columbus, but it was never Beal’s dream to play for the Buckeyes. His family’s allegiance instead was for their old home state, not their new one.

    “I wouldn’t say ‘hate,’ but that’s when the dislike really came (toward Ohio State). That’s literally what happened,” Beal said with a chuckle. “An Ohio State fan will argue with you all day long.”

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    Baker Mayfield spreads the wealth in season-opening rout

    Oklahoma senior quarterback Baker Mayfield completed 19 of 20 passes for 329 yards and three touchdowns in Saturday's 56-7 season-opening win over UTEP.
    BY JOHN ROHDE

    SoonerSports.com Contributor

    Sept. 2, 2017

    Last month, Oklahoma senior quarterback Baker Mayfield tweeted the following: "Y'all are going to have to show some respect for my receivers. People saying I don't have help, say what you want about me. Not my guys."

    Mayfield sent the tweet on Aug. 9. He delivered the message with conviction — and with a lot of help from those same receivers — during a scintillating first-half performance in Saturday's season-opening 56-7 rout of UTEP at Gaylord Family – Oklahoma Memorial Stadium.

    Mayfield completed 19 of 20 passes for 329 yards and three touchdowns before intermission. He completed his first 16 pass attempts, which is the best start to a game in school history. Throw in his final five attempts in last year's Sugar Bowl victory over Auburn and Mayfield completed 21 straight passes, which fell one shy of a school record.

    Mayfield showcased his surrounding talent by spreading the wealth. His first 14 completions went to 10 different receivers. "There's a reason I spoke out and took up for them because I know what they're capable of," Mayfield said of this year's lesser-known teammates. "They're great players."

    The Sooners' offensive debut under new head coach Lincoln Riley was remarkable considering OU's offense lost three standout players who combined for a staggering 2,435 rushing yards, 2,168 receiving yards, 844 kick return yards and 47 touchdowns last season.

    Gone are the school's all-time rushing leader in Samaje Perine (4,122 career yards), the school's single-season all-purpose yardage record holder in Joe Mixon (1,274 rushing yards; 538 receiving yards; 519 return yards; 2,331 total yards; 194.2 per-game average) and Dede Westbrook (80 receptions; 1,524 yards; 19.0 per-catch average; 17 touchdowns), who was selected as the Fred Biletnikoff Award winner as the nation's outstanding receiver.

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    The Sooners' Life of Riley is upon us

    BY JOHN ROHDE

    SoonerSports.com Contributor

    Aug. 31, 2017

    Bob Stoops said he felt prepared going into his first game as Oklahoma's head football coach in September 1999, but he still had some anxiety.

    “I was always anxious before games,” Stoops admitted. “Not so much nervous, but it's hard to pace yourself. You just want to get out there and play the game. You want it to begin. It was kind of always that way. You get up in the morning and it's hard to pace yourself so you're not worn out by the time the game gets here.”

    Meanwhile, Barry Switzer was his usual confident self before his debut as the Sooners' head coach 44 years ago, even though media had picked his team to finish fourth in the 1973 Big Eight Conference preseason poll behind Nebraska, Colorado and Missouri. Switzer didn't see it that way and made his point with a simple roll call inside the OU locker room after practice.

    “I told our guys, ‘Whoever is going to be Big Eight champion is going to be the second-best team in this league because we're going to kick their (tails),'” Switzer recalled. “Hey, I want to know something. Lee Roy Selmon, are you in here? Dewey Selmon, you here? Rod Shoate? Jimbo Elrod? Randy Hughes? I started calling out all these names and they all said, ‘Yeah, coach. I'm here.' I said, ‘OK, just checking. I read where we weren't going to be worth a damn. Heck, (previous coach) Chuck Fairbanks is the only one who's left.' They all died laughing.”

    Lincoln Riley's first game as the Sooners' head coach arrives Saturday when OU hosts UTEP at 2:30 at Gaylord Family – Oklahoma Memorial Stadium.

    The most impactful ingredient for any new head coach is what he inherits. In this regard, Stoops' transition at OU was vastly different than what transpired with Switzer and Riley.

    Already on staff, Switzer and Riley simply had to change offices when they became the head man. Switzer was the Sooners' assistant head coach/offensive coordinator under Fairbanks, who left for the NFL's New England Patriots. Riley was offensive coordinator/quarterbacks coach before moving into Stoops' freshly completed office that was part of the $160-million renovation project in the south end zone.

    “You realize the magnitude of the job the second they say. ‘It's you,'” Stoops said of the day he was tabbed by OU athletic director Joe Castiglione. “I realized I had to get to work immediately.”

    Wife Carol Stoops returned to Florida after her husband's introductory news conference while Stoops remained in Norman with no change of clothes. He quickly gathered a new wardrobe at Harold's. When it came to recruiting, Stoops already knew of Tuttle High School standout quarterback Jason White, who became his first visit. Stoops didn't return home to Gainesville until Christmas break when the recruiting period went dead.

    “Those first few weeks were like a blur to me between recruiting, hiring a staff, yada yada, yada,” Stoops explained.

    A far more pressing issue for Stoops was inheriting a downtrodden team coming off the worst four-year span in school history. One of college football's premier programs had gone a combined 17-27-1 (.389) with no bowl appearances the previous four seasons under Howard Schnellenberger (5-5-1) and John Blake (12-22-0). A massive overhaul was required.

    “The biggest adjustment for me was the amount of decisions,” Stoops said. “It was a hundred decisions a day. Sometimes it felt like a decision a minute. ‘How are we going to do this; how are we going to do that; how are we getting to the game; where are we going to stay; what's the schedule for game day; where are we practicing; how do we take the field; how do we stretch; when do we hold meetings?' What I couldn't believe was how many decisions need to be made in a day.”

    At the other end of the spectrum, Switzer took over a program that had gone 22-2 the previous two seasons and had finished No. 2 each year in the Associated Press polls.

    “My situation was totally different than Bob because I was inheriting a great football team,” said Switzer, who doubled his salary from $12,000 to $24,000 when he became head coach. “I had been with these players, had coached these players. I was so ingrained, so attuned with everyone. I knew we were going to kick the hell out of everybody. I knew we were good. I was never concerned. Bob and I were two different scenarios completely. Lincoln steps into a better situation than Bob did. Lincoln and I both stepped into great situations.”

    Not only were Switzer, Stoops and Riley hired as first-time head coaches, each was young at the time.

    Stoops was 37 years, 83 days old when he was introduced on Dec. 1, 1998. His first game was a 49-0 victory at home against Indiana State on Sept. 11, 1999.

    Switzer was 35 years, 116 days old when he replaced Fairbanks on Jan. 29, 1973. His first game was a 42-14 victory at Baylor on Sept. 15, 1973.

    Riley was 33 years, 275 days old when he was appointed as Stoops' successor on June 7, 2017. Saturday's debut comes three days before Riley's 34th birthday.

    Curiosity might have been Stoops' most prominent emotion entering his first game as head coach. “I was very curious,” Stoops said. “I felt good, but you still have to see it.” As for the anxiety, Stoops said he felt that every season opener. “I'm always the most anxious in the first game because it's always a new team, but this (1999) was really a new team,” Stoops said. “I had never been on the field with them. You didn't know if practices and scrimmages were going to carry onto the field. You still have to see it happen. There's always new pieces. Anxious to see what are we really going to be like.”

    What did Stoops feel most secure about? “It was pretty much the same thing we emphasized over 18 years,” Stoops said. “There's no substitute for it. You have to play hard, play smart and above all else, you've got to be tough and physical. If I've said it once, I've said it a thousand times, ‘It takes no talent to be those three things.' You'll win a helluva lot more than you'll lose if you're those three things. To be honest with you, I started with that and I don't ever remember not emphasizing it.”

    Stoops' first team went 7-5, capped with a 27-25 loss to Mississippi on a 39-yard field goal on the final play of the Independence Bowl in what would be his worst record as the Sooners' head coach. Stoops said he didn't have a certain won-loss record in mind prior to his first season at OU. “But I had a bowl game in mind, for sure,” he said. “Can't remember when I hadn't been (in a bowl game) at that point. A bowl game was, for sure, a must in my eyes.”

    Stoops retired having advanced to 24 consecutive bowl games as an assistant with Kansas State (1993-95) and Florida (1996-98) and his entire tenure leading the Sooners (1999-2016).

    “The whole year, we were learning,” Stoops said of the 1999 season. “We had some games we were ahead, but didn't know how to finish. In the middle part of the year, we really had to emphasize how to handle a lead. These guys hadn't been in the lead a bunch lately. That was another wake-up call for coaches, another point we really had to hammer home and not take it for granted that they understand it. We were up 16 at Notre Dame. Up 17 against Texas. Guys were smiling and giggling and we still had three more quarters to go. Then we started to close games out.”

    In Stoops' second season, OU began No. 19 in the preseason poll, had risen to No. 1 by the Oct. 29 poll and captured the school's seventh national crown with a 13-0 season and a 13-2 victory over Florida State in the Orange Bowl. Stoops followed with a combined 47-7 record the next four seasons and reached the national title game two more times.

    “It was the coaching that made the difference,” Switzer said of Stoops' immediate impact. “As soon as I saw them play, I knew they had it all in place. I thought, ‘These guys know what they're doing. This is different than what I've seen before.' ”

    As impressive as Stoops' start was with the Sooners, Switzer's was even more astonishing.

    His first team, picked fourth in that 1973 preseason Big Eight poll, wound up finishing 10-0-1 overall and 7-0 in conference play and dominated preseason conference favorites Nebraska (27-0), Colorado (34-7) and Missouri (31-3).

    After his debut victory at Baylor, Switzer then played top-ranked and defending national champion USC to a 7-7 tie at the Los Angeles Coliseum. Switzer went 29-0-1 before suffering his first loss and was 37-1-2 with back-to-back national championships before suffering his second loss.

    Again, none of this came as a surprise to Switzer. “You know what you are,” said Switzer, who would win a third national championship in 1985. “Coaches more than anybody know what their team's abilities are, what their talents are, the strengths and weaknesses of their opponent. It comes down to you playing better than they do. If you do, you have a chance to win. Coaches know that better than anybody. I knew going in if somebody was better than we were. Most of the time we were better than they were. After the game, it was time to get on to the next one. Coaches and players approach games totally different than fans.”

    With his 157-29-4 overall record, Switzer retains the highest winning percentage (.837) of any OU football coach and now laughs that he and Stoops are “about to be in the stands to do ‘Friday Night Lights' together.” Stoops' twin sons, seniors, and Switzer's grandson, a sophomore, are on the same high school team this season.

    When Stoops retired almost three months ago, he left as the program's winningest coach with a 190-48 (.798) overall record, 10 Big 12 Conference championships and 14 10-win seasons. Much like when Switzer took the reins, Riley appears to have inherited a thoroughbred.

    When his first game as a head coach approached, did Stoops telephone Switzer or former Florida boss Steve Spurrier for some calming last-minute advice? “Nah,” Stoops said. “At that point, none of those guys can help you. You're ready. I was ready for it. I had been in a lot of big games before that, just like Lincoln has. It doesn't change. Lincoln knows what to do. He's ready for it.”

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